Posts belonging to Category 'This Day in the War'

This Day in the War: 12/17/10

Tuesday Dec. 17 1861
BELLIGERENT BRITS BADLY BOTHERED
The first newspapers from London printed after the “Trent Affair” had exploded there, reached the former colonies in America today, and reactions were strong and immediate. Capt. Charles Wilkes, U.S. Navy, had stopped the British mail ship “Trent” on the high seas by force of arms, and had [...]

This Day in the War: 12/16/10

Monday Dec. 16 1861
VEXATIOUS VALLANDIGHAM VIES FOR VOTES
In one of the odder political actions of the early days of the War, Ohio’s Democratic congressman Clement Vallandigham introduced a resolution on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives. The point of the resolution was to commend Captain Charles Wilkes of the USS San Jacinto [...]

This Day in the War: 12/15/10

Sunday Dec. 15 1861
BLOCKADE BUSTERS BADLY BATTERED
When it was first announced, the Union blockade of shipping in and out of Southern ports sounded like a bad joke. The Federal navy was an unimpressive force to begin with. Many of its vessels had been sailed South by captains and crews who sided with the Confederacy; others [...]

This Day in the War: 12/14/10

Saturday Dec. 14, 1861
QUEEN’S CONSORT CRUELLY CADAVERIZED
Prince Albert, known to generations of Americans only as a brand name of pipe tobacco, was the consort to the queen whose name denotes an era, Victoria of England. Although not the king, and possessed of no official duties beyond begetting the next generation of royalty, he was quite [...]

This Day in the War: 12/13/10

Friday Dec. 13 1861
BUFFALO BELLIGERENCE BREAKS BOTH
Over in the western part of Virginia (which was still one state in these days) there is a high spot of land known as Buffalo Mountain. On this hill was a Confederate outpost known as Camp Allegheny. This was not an entirely comfortable place for them to be, as [...]

This Day in the War: 12/09/10

Monday Dec. 9 1861
CRITICAL CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE CONFIRMED
There are few things a general hates more that a crowd of civilians hanging around, asking questions, and acting like it has the right to demand answers. That, essentially, is what the generals of the United States got today, as Congress passed legislation creating a body called the [...]

This Day in the War: 12/8/10

Sunday Dec. 8 1861
BELIEVERS BRING BIBLE BLITZ
As this Sabbath was commendably unmarred by acts of mayhem and militarism, it offers an opportunity to note the actions of an unlikely group of war supporters: The American Bible Society. This group, supported entirely by private donations from individuals and churches, released a remarkable report today. Less than [...]

This Day in the War: 12/7/10

Saturday Dec. 7 1861
TRENT TURMOIL TIMES TWO
Communications technology not being, in 1861, quite what it is today, the word had not yet percolated through the U.S. Navy of all the havoc being caused by the USS San Jacinto”s capture of the British mail ship Trent on the high seas. The Trent had been carrying Confederate [...]

This Day in the War: 12/06/10

Friday Dec. 6 1861
MEADE MAKING MEALTIME MANEUVER
The saying “an army travels on its stomach” is usually attributed to Napoleon, but the truth of it was probably known by every commander since the dawn of time. The Army of the Potomac was stationed in the north of Virginia, so it made more sense to let [...]

This Day in the War: 12/03/10

Tuesday Dec. 3 1861
PRESIDENT PONDERS PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS
Abraham Lincoln’s fame today is certainly not based on his thoughts in the field of economic abstraction, but he did tackle the subject in, of all places, his State of the Union message to Congress this year. “Labor is prior to, and independent of, capital,” he wrote. “Capital is [...]