A story of slavery in the White Mountains

The number of slaves in the South always exceeded those in the North because the South’s plantation economy (based on rice, tobaccco, cotton, sugar, etc.) employed a large labor force. But in the North, while slaves were fewer, at one time they were omnipresent; in towns and seaports, farms and mansions. Some came from the Spanish Indies, some were captured Native Americans, but most came from Africa.

A New England visitor in 1687, astonished at the number of blacks he saw, said, “There is not a house in Boston, however small may be its name, that has not one or two,” writes David Freeman Hawke in “Everyday Life in Early America.”

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