CWi Guide to Civil War Blogs

 

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Confederate Book Review
Those tempted to blow by this site on the basis of its name should take a look before doing so. While certain assumptions are going to be made about anything with "Confederate" in its name in these ill-tempered times, the blog is primarily a book-review resource and pleasantly even-handed in tone. Recent works reviewed cover topics both controversial--was Lincoln really still a proponent of black colonization to Africa or South America even after the Emancipation Proclamation? --to perfectly respectable, like a look at the Confederate Soldier's Home in Lexington KY. Blogmaster Robert presents them all on their own terms and lets the potential reader decide their own level of further interest.    NEW ADDITION

 

Crossed Sabers Crossed Sabers
"Don" is another of those who sticks to the old tradition of blogger anonymity, at least as far as last name is concerned. He was a member of a more recent version of a Regular Cavalry unit, and blogs here about Regular Cavalry forces of the Civil War period. He notes that these are often under-represented in historical attentions due to greater emphasis on the volunteer cavalry units. Officers and common soldiers of the horse troops all find a place here as Don turns up information about them.  

 

Crossroads
You have to hit the "About" button at the top to find out that this is a solo production of Brooks Simpson, although the number of posts titled "Civil Warriors Greatest Hits" might have given you a clue. He describes the site as "... a discussion of various topics, most related to history, historians, and the academic life..." and that it is. The discussion, at least of late, concentrates on the theme of the role of the the doctoral degree in history and the holders thereof. How does their work relate to both "the conversation" inside the history biz, and how and to what degree does or should it relate to the greater society outside the professoriat? Interesting questions both to those directly involved and those of us whose interest in the field exceeds our credentials therein.      NEW ADDITION



Draw the Sword Draw the Sword
Jenny  Goellnitz describes herself as "...an avid runner, cancer survivor, and student of the Civil War." She is also an absolutely terrific photographer, and visitor to Gettysburg as often as can be arranged from her home base in Ohio. Her studies of each and every Union monument at that battlefield may be the best pictures of many of them ever taken, and a smart publisher would arrange to promptly buy them to illustrate a new book on the subject.



 
If one is coming to this site for the first time, there can be no better date to do it than mid-March, as close to the 17th of the month as possible. By happy chance this is just what we did, but even brief inspection of the site reveals it to be much more than a once-a-year invocation of shamrocks and green beer and similar trivialities from the American side of the pond. The author, Damian Shiels, is an actual Irishman and an archaeologist by trade with a specialty in battlefield archaeology. He works on Irish battles for a living and studies American battles for fun, saying his "..main research interests relate to the Irish in the Western Theatre, especially in the Army of Tennessee. In my spare time (apart from running this blog!) I am currently researching the 5th Confederate Infantry Regiment, a unit which principally consisted of Irishmen from Memphis." The article on "St. Patrick's Day in the Army of the Potomac, 1863" is not to be missed. This is a truly spectacular site.    

 

Michigan Civil War Blog  Michigan Civil War Blog 
John Dempsey, who usually goes by "Jack" is a member of the Michigan Historical Commission with a mission: he wants it known, remembered and noted what his state did in the Civil War. This is very easy to do in a state like Virginia where you have a battlefield about every mile and a half, but harder to do in the upper Midwest where the action was in the packing plants and the industrial foundries and the recruiting stations. John Dempsey, who usually goes by "Jack" is a member of the Michigan Historical Commission with a mission: he wants it known, remembered and noted what his state did in the Civil War. This is very easy to do in a state like Virginia where you have a battlefield about every mile and a half, but harder to do in the upper Midwest where the action was in the packing plants and the industrial foundries and the recruiting stations.  

 

North Carolina and the Civil War  North Carolina and the Civil War 
Michael Hardy studies and writes about, as you might well have guessed, the participation of North Carolina in the Civil War. Unlike Andrew Duppstadt, whose interests are coastal and maritime, Hardy works more in the western and mountainous parts of the state. He has published books on the topic and is currently researching on another regiment from that part of the state.  

 

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