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 Posted: Fri Oct 19th, 2007 02:09 pm
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younglobo
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The warden and I took a nice trip  last weekend to St. Louis and visited Grants Farm, I must confess it was her idea I think she thought it was civil war era history and thought I would go just for that . I was much impressed with the site and staff there they were top shelf. Of course it was Friday morning when we went so wasnt much in the way of traffic we got the house and tour guide all to ourselves learned alot about Grant and they have a nice interactive museum there. Didnt know that Green was a victorian color for homes, I am glad that went out of style. Beings that I have Confederate leanings, have always looked at Grant as the villian he beat us and killed alot of good men to do it , but the site showed the personal side of the man which took the villian view away . Heck I even bought a book about him at the book store "Grant " By Jean Edward Smith which is one of two books on Union generals in my collection so theres a first.  Basically im saying check the place out if you get by it is worth it.

Even something for the wife and kids too as Anhiser Busch owns the property that surrounds the site and they have a kind of zoo that you can take a tram ride and see animals from alll over the world, also have the Clydesdale farm there, a museum of thier own and FREE beer course it was like 50 degrees that AM so i didnt partake.

We also took a riverboat dinner cruise that was pretty awsome too if you get the chance but the diesel engine rumble kind of bummed me out .

Last edited on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 02:11 pm by younglobo



 Posted: Fri Oct 19th, 2007 03:49 pm
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booklover
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Younglobo,

I was at Grant's Farm probably about 35 or so years ago. What I can remember of it was fun. I don't remember the farm itself, but IIRC there was a petting zoo around because my cousin, who had broken his arm, was trying to feed a goat but nearly got trampled. I also remember my aunt drinking a beer, which shocked me (I was a naive country boy then and with a mother who was strongly anti-alcohol, never knew anybody to actually imbibe!). By the way, Smith's bio of Grant is very good.

Best
Rob



 Posted: Fri Oct 19th, 2007 04:56 pm
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ole
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Haven't read Smith's bio. Does it add anything useful? Or is a particularly good read?

Used to live in the St. Louis burbs. Drove by Grant's farm a time or two. Never did stop in. But, at that time, it was simply Grant's Farm.

Finally, a hint for better living: Beer is not just a breakfast drink.

ole



 Posted: Fri Oct 19th, 2007 07:23 pm
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PvtClewell
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And pizza is not just for breakfast anymore


A few years ago at the Civil War Institute our theme for the week was Grant and there was a panel discussion with brooks simpson, jean edward smith, william mcfeely and john simon. very interesting. Grant's star is rising once more.



 Posted: Fri Oct 19th, 2007 08:53 pm
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ole
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Would have very much liked to have sat in on that, rabbit. (Gotta mix thing up a bit now and then.) I'd pay good money to have been there. Why was I not informed sooner? Gonna nail an effigy up to that sugar maple out there, and hang a sign on it that says "Sgt. Clewell. He didn't clewell us in on time."

Seriously. If something of that magnitude comes up again, I would very much like to know about it.

ole



 Posted: Fri Oct 19th, 2007 09:57 pm
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PvtClewell
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Ole,

The Civil War Institute is a weeklong seminar devoted to a specific Civil War theme. For 2008, we are revisiting Lincoln. The man, not the town in Nebraska.

Check this site:
http://www.gettysburg.edu/civilwar/institute/annual_conference/

There is usually a waiting list to attend the CWI because it is limited to about 350 folks per year, most of whom willfully return again and again, like myself, and therefore don't open up spaces for others. I will say this, however: this past year, I saw more new faces than I have in a long time. Give it a shot if you're interested.



 Posted: Fri Oct 19th, 2007 11:08 pm
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Regina
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Interesting that this post came up today.  Last Sunday, I rode the train into Manhattan, got off in Harlem at 125th St. and walked over to Grant's tomb.  It was a beautiful day and a beautiful neighborhood up around the monument (Riverside Cathedral right across the street and the view of the Hudson River, too).  I had never been there before and I'm so glad I went.  It was incredible.  We also walked over to 5 E 66th Street where he lived when he wrote most of his memoirs (there's just a plaque on the side of a building which stands on the site--the house he lived in is no longer there).  I just finished reading his memoirs before going to the sites so it was very powerful to be there.  At the tomb, I picked up a pamphlet about Grant's Farm, which I had never heard of before.  So, thanks for the post, sounds like a really great place to visit. 



 Posted: Sat Oct 20th, 2007 12:09 am
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ole
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And I do thank you for the post, Regina. If he'd just remained a general, he'd have been received more kindly today.

Had thought that his final home was somewhere upstate--outside the megalopolis. Thanks.

ole

Last edited on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 12:12 am by ole



 Posted: Sat Oct 20th, 2007 12:41 am
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Texas Defender
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Ole-

   General Grant did indeed live on 66th St. in NYC.

General Grant's House in New York

   Near the end of his life, when he was struggling to complete his memoirs, the family moved to Mount MacGregor, where he could be made more comfortable. He was visited by many notables, including his old friend, former Confederate General Simon Bolivar Buckner, and his new wife.

General Grant at Mount MacGregor, by O.P. Clarke, Part 1

   He managed to finish his manuscript only a few days before the end of his life. The memoirs were a great success, and restored the family's fortune.

 

Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant: Information and Much More from

Answers.com

 

  

 



 Posted: Wed Oct 24th, 2007 08:10 pm
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younglobo
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film at the vc said he only lived like 8 days after he finished his memiors



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