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 Posted: Thu Feb 8th, 2007 05:38 pm
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Fuller
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I am looking for any info about a home that was owned by a Mr. William Young during the battle of Gettysburg. All I know is that his home stood on the ground where part of the battle took place. The house withstood the battle but his crops were destoyed. I was wondering if there are any maps showing homesteads during this period to pinpoint the exact location. Any help would be appreciated

Fuller 



 Posted: Thu Feb 8th, 2007 08:17 pm
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ole
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If you can be a bit more specific, Fuller, I'll spread out my Batchelder maps and look. It will be on one of his maps, but there are more than 20 of them; hence, a bit more specific. Out near McPherson's Ridge? North of town? West of town? In other words, part of which battle? 1st day? Cavalry Clash? Culp's Hill? Etc.

Ole



 Posted: Fri Feb 9th, 2007 01:32 pm
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Fuller
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Ole,

This research is for a friend and the info I gave above is all she has.  I hope to find more.  Thanks for trying to help me out.

Fuller



 Posted: Fri Feb 9th, 2007 02:08 pm
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Fuller,

I just finished checking the Humprey/Warren map of the battlefield which shows the homesteads on the field, and I can find no "Young". It's possible I missed it since the maps are very large and the homes are very small, but neither Laurie or I can find a Young.

I then checked the 1850 survey map of the town and there is no Young there either. Tell your friend to google Adams County Historical Society and try to get ahold of Wayne Motts. If anyone knows, he would. Good luck...



 Posted: Fri Feb 9th, 2007 04:12 pm
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Fuller
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Thanks Javal.  I also have contacted Gettysburg park itself.  Maybe a Ranger there would know where to direct me.  I asked my friend if she was certain about his name and she is.  I just spoke with her and she said that the farm is South East of the town.  She said between Baltimore Pike and Taney Town.  Cemetary Hill is above the farm.  It is close to Mt. Joy.  I do not know the area at all and I have no maps infront of me to check the spelling of these.

Fuller



 Posted: Fri Feb 9th, 2007 04:17 pm
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Fuller
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My hope in this is to be able to pinpoint where the property stood and maybe even find a photo.  Thanks for your help.



 Posted: Fri Feb 9th, 2007 08:55 pm
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Fuller
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Okay, this is what I have found...A very nice Ranger at Gettysburg let me know that a Mr. William Young did file a federal claim for damages (I'm assuming because of the loss of his crops).  They have no record of him owning property in Adams Co there at the park but the Ranger thought that maybe he was actually a resident of Highland Township or Germany Township near Littlestown, PA.

I came across some news clippings of personal accounts from the Young family that would place them closer than the 8 mile distance to Littlestown though.  I believe the farm was much closer to Gettysburg.

Here is a great little bit of history from Laura Young one of the many children of William...

She was born August 11, 1855 a mile and a half east of the little city of Gettysburg on the farm owned by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Young.  She was therefore eight years old when the great battle was fought.

"It was early in the morning of July 1, 1863" she says "that I recall hearing of preparations for the attack the Confederate army was to make on their sweep northwards.  My parents were busy hiding their valuables, and storing away food, when the first shots were heard.  Our farm was situated between Round Top and Culp's Hill, on the Baltimore Turnpike that led into the villiage.

"The line of attack formed between those two points and it already went across our 250 acre farm.  As the march went on, our crops of wheat and hay were thoroughly trampled down, and I can see to this day the men falling one after another as the cannon balls penetrated their bodies.  We were advised to abandon our home the first day because of the danger, but after spending the night at my uncle's farm, my father decided it was safe for us to come home.

"I had four brothers and two brother-in-laws in the Army of the Potomac.  My two sisters living at home were called upon to help with nursing the wounded, who were housed in the schools and churches and farm houses.  The bodies of the dead were buried temporarily in the fields, and the whole of Adam's County was turned into a bloody field of war.

"The Army of the Potomac was first led by Hooker but on June 28th George Meade was put in command because of a dispute between Halleck and Hooker.  It was a beautiful site to see the army marching down the Baltimore Pike, with the infantry, artillery and calvary, all boys and men we knew and who lived in our neighborhood.  And I can remember begging my father to let me go to the corner of the field to see my brother Sam as he was marching four abreast with the other souldiers.  But because of my age and the danger i was not allowed to go.

"Union soldiers were quartered on our farm during the three days struggle and unless you have seen armies in actual battle you cannot realize the bloodshed of war.

"The second day of the fight was similar to the first one.  Our army would advance and then retreat and the struggle for the possesion of Round Top was one of the fiercest single combats in history.  And even though the hill was finally taken by our soldiers it cost hundreds of lives.

"We were awakend early on July 3 by the roar of the artillery from Culp's Hill, and the most desperate attack of the three days was Pickett's charge on Cemetary hill near our farm.  And because of the heavy loss of men on both sides this spot was named 'Bloody Angle'.  It was on Shefy's peach orchard that General Pickett was killed."

Equally interesting is Laura's account of the Gettysburg Address...

"It was four months later, November 19, that I heard President Linclon deliver the address at the Gettysburg cemetary.  There were throngs of people gathered to hear the President of the United States and I can remember that fall day when with my parents I went to the National Cemetary for the occasion.  Edward Everette Hale gave a talk that lasted over an hour, glorifying the war, and in his flowery way he made the valley ring with applause.  And then I can remember President Lincoln in his awkward way, tall and thin and with a grave face, standing before the people and beginning his famous 'Fourscore and..' Dead silence greeted it's close, with not a hand clapped nor a word spoken, not a sound of approval.  Only as I looked into the eyes of my father, I saw the tears that I had never seen before.  And I recall that going home at dusk with my parents by my side, my father said to my mother 'Lincoln said more in five minutes than Hale did in an hour.'"

William had a young son Charles, who also remembered hearing the address and even had a run in with the President when he was 12 years old...

"My father was a great admirer of Lincoln and my brothers were in the Potomac Division of the Union Army.  I stood only a few feet from Lincoln and gazed into his face as he delivered his speech.  As I remember it, he had a crumbled piece of paper in his hand.  I remember distinctly his grave and solem appearance as he stood and faced the audience.

At the President's reception, which followed, I took my place in the line to meet Lincoln.  I was barefooted and held a chipped hat on my breast.  The line was pacing rapidly with everybody bowing graciously to Lincoln

I looked up into his face, saying 'How are you, Old Abe?' My approach and remark attracted his attention.  He grasped me by the arm and with his other hand on my head, he said, 'God bless you, little fellow.'

Fuller



 Posted: Wed Feb 14th, 2007 06:27 pm
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ole
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Fuller:

I have found a W. Young Farm in the Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, pageXCV, plate 2. It's quite a bit south of "between Little Round Top and Culps Hill." Don't know what kind of map you might have, but if it covers much more than the battlefield, you can locate the farm. (The farm is on the plate labeled Gregg's Union and Stuart's Confederate Cavalry.)

In this area, the Baltimore Pike runs about due SE. The farm is located about 4000 feet about due NE of the Pike on a road perpendicular to the pike. There is no name on the road, but it follows Plum or Cress Run (not the Plum Run west of the Round Tops) which flows into White Run just east of the Pike. White Run supercedes and runs into Rock Creek

The buildings are across a field from the unnamed road and named creek. No way for me to tell the size of the field, but it seems to be the equivalent in size to other fields in the area. If you bisect a line from the northern end of the Culp's Hill defenses and Little Round Top, the Young farm will be directly east. It is slightly north of east of the Rock Creek Bridge on the Baltimore Pike. (The mentioned 4000 feet.)

There is a Widow Young and a Jon Young in the area, if your map shows "Dutch Road."

I see no direct evidence that they got their crops trampled, but it is quite likely that Gregg's Brigade (now into Bachelder maps) rode through it in the morning, and they'd have seen Custer's and McInthosh's Brigades riding up Dutch Road. The major fighting was at least more than a mile away, just south of the Hanover Road and a NE of the W. Young farm.

Laura's recollections were certainly enhanced over the years, but having their crops trampled (a brigade of cavalry will certainly do that) is distinctly possible and, if the old man didn't keep them in the cellar, the battle might well have been visible and audible, though almost two miles away.

Hope this helps your friend.

Ole

Last edited on Wed Feb 14th, 2007 06:32 pm by ole



 Posted: Wed Feb 14th, 2007 06:49 pm
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Fuller
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Thank you for your research ole.  Sounds like it's time for me to invest in some maps.  From what my friend has said, the Ranger and the letter from Laura, I was very confused myself as to where the farm was located.  I'm sure Laura's facts were enhanced from picking up a book or two about the battle and from years passing.  It is interesting though to hear a personal account of a civilian who was pretty dang close to the fighting.

Thanks again for your help!

Fuller 

Last edited on Wed Feb 14th, 2007 06:50 pm by Fuller



 Posted: Wed Feb 14th, 2007 07:11 pm
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ole
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Rather than investing a gread deal......... Last year, Barnes & Noble reprinted the Official Military Atlas and was selling it for $20. There's enough detail on that plate to locate the farm unless it's under a shopping mall. The second map I used I found in the book: John Bachelder's History of the Battle of Gettysburg. It's available through Morningside at a price less than the actual maps -- maybe even less through amazon or abebooks. At any rate, if you have interest in Gettysburg, they are good books to have. I'd also suggest asking Eric Wittenberg about maps as he wrote extensively on the cavalry fracas. The other author posts here, 'though.

Ole



 Posted: Wed Feb 14th, 2007 07:23 pm
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Fuller
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Gracias ole.  By the way...should I be pernuncin it like "Ole timer" or "Su nombre es Ole"? :)



 Posted: Thu Feb 15th, 2007 12:53 am
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ole
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Fuller: Is Ole as in Ole and Olena.

 



 Posted: Thu Feb 15th, 2007 02:19 am
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Fuller I have the atlas hat Ole mentioned from Barnes and Noble.  I won it in a drawing at the Round Table Conference this year in Sacramento .  it is wonderful.  Just heavy to lift !!!  Worth it though. 



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