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 Posted: Tue Nov 24th, 2009 05:57 am
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Unionblue
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ThomasWashington wrote: And anyway I'm not quibbling over whether state sovereignty was a "good idea" or not-- I'm stating the fact that each state was, and is, a sovereign nation under the Constitution.  When you have facts that prove otherwise,  then you can counter; but I'm really not interested in your opinion regarding whether or not you personally approve of each state being sovereign.


There were a few who felt state sovereignty was NOT a "good idea."

From a speech by John Quincy Adams at the Jubilee of the Constitution:

"...It has been my purpose, Fellow-Citizens, in this discourse to show:

1. That this Union was formed by a spontaneous movement of the people of the thirteen English Colonies; all subjects of the King of Great Britain - bound to him in allegiance, and to the British empire as their country.  That the first object of this Union, was united resistance against oppression, and to obtain from the government of their country redress of their wrongs.

2. That failing in this object, their petitions having been spurned, and the oppressions of which they complained, aggravated beyond endurance, their Delegates in Congress, in their name and by their authority, issued the Declaration of Independence - proclaiming them to the world as one people, absolving them from their ties and oaths of allegiance to their king and country - renouncing that country; declared the UNITED Colonies, Independent States, and announcing that this ONE PEOPLE of thirteen united independent states, by that act, assumed among the powers of the earth, that separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitled them.

3. That in justification of themselves for this act of transcendent power, they proclaimed the principles upon which they held all lawful government upon earth to be founded - whic principles were, the natural, unalienable, imprescriptible rights of man, specifying among them, life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness - that the institution of government is to secure to men in society the possession of those rights: that the institution, dissolution, and reinstitution of government, belong exclusively to THE PEOPLE under a moral responsibility to the Supreme Ruler of the universe; and that all the just powers of government are derived from the consent of the governed.

4. That under this proclamation of principles, the dissolution of allegiance to the British king, and the compatriot connection with the people of the British empire, were accomplished; and the one people of the United States of America, became one separate sovereign independent power, assuming an equal station among the nations of the earth.

5. That this one people did not immediately institute a government for themselves.  But instead of it, their delegates in Congress, by authority from their separate state legislatures, without voice or consultation of the people, instituted a mere confederacy.

6. That this confederacy totally departed from the principles of the Declaration of Independence, and substituted instead of the constituent power of the people, an assumed sovereignty of each separate state, as the source of all its authority.

7. That as a primitive source of power, this separate state sovereignty, was not only a departure from the principles of the Declaration of Independence, but directly contrary to, and utterly incompatible with them.

8. That the tree was made known by its fruits.  That after five years wasted in its preparation, the confederation dragged out a miserable existence of eight years more, and expired like a candle in the socket, having brought the union itself to the verge of dissolution.

9. That the Constitution of the United States was a return to the principles of the Declaration of Independence, and the exclusive constituent power of the people.  That it was the work of the ONE PEOPLE of the United States; and that those United States, though doubled in numbers, still constitute as a nation, but ONE PEOPLE.

10. That this Constitution, making due allowance for the imperfections and errors incident to all human affairs, has under all the vicissitudes and changes of war and peace, been administered upon those same principles, during a career of fifty years.

11. That its fruits have been, still making allowance for human imperfection, a more perfect union, established justice, domestic tranquility, provision for the common defense, promotion of the general welfare, and the enjoyment of the blessings of liberty by the constituent people, and their posterity to the present day.

And now the future is all before us, and Providence our guide."

Adams entire speech may be viewed at the following website:

http://www.lonang.com/exlibris/misc/1839-jub.htm

Notice how Adams ties the Declaration of Independence in with the Constitution, both of which are the will of the people?

Sincerely,

Unionblue

Last edited on Tue Nov 24th, 2009 06:35 am by Unionblue



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