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 Posted: Fri May 6th, 2011 06:40 am
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Hellcat
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Ok, after some of the comments in some of the threads here I'm a little currious about something. How many officers were politicians before and during the war. I'm not talking they had been politicians when the war began, gave their seat up temporarily to serve in the army, then got re-elected after their enlistment period was up or they resigned. I'm talking they were still serving as an elected offical at the same time they were serving in the army.

Clint Johnson mentions in Civil War Blunders that Edward D Baker was still serving as a Senator for the state of Oregon even while serving as a Colonel in the army. It's pointed out that at the time a general's commision meant Congressmen had to give up their seats and that Baker wasn't ready to do that. He also states that Baker often came into Senate sessions straight from the field where he made a big show of being an active duty officer before his fellow senators.

I don't know. I mean it was a different time and all, but to me I personally think that no matter the rank senators and representatives should have been forced to give up their seats in order to accept a commision .



 Posted: Sat May 7th, 2011 01:59 am
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Doc Ce
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Extra Billy Smith was running for political office during the Gettysburg campaign if I'm correct. Because he wasn't trusted by Ewell/Early, Gordon was sent with him to investigate a potential union threat to the east on the first day of Gettysburg thus a potential reason for the confederates not taking Culps hill that night.

Doc C



 Posted: Sun Aug 18th, 2013 11:46 am
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Barlow
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Robert Toombs was in the Confederate Congress and was the second choice for President after Jeff Davis.  He was sent back to civilian life after Antietam, although he did a respectable job holding of the 9th Corps at Burnside's Bridge.



 Posted: Mon Aug 19th, 2013 09:02 pm
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Johan Steele
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Blackjack Logan was a serving politician before and after the war. He did a credible job as a Regt, Div, Corps and eventually army commander.



 Posted: Mon Aug 19th, 2013 10:26 pm
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Hellcat
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But did Logan serve DURING the war while he was also an officer in the Federal army. The same for Toombs and the Confederate Army. I'm finding that Toombs was the Sec State of the Confederacy and he resigned to join the army.



 Posted: Tue Aug 20th, 2013 02:34 am
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Texas Defender
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Hellcat-

  The answer to the question of whether or not General Logan served in the U.S. Army when he was also a Congressman (Democrat from Illinois) depends on what date he resigned his Congressional seat. There seems to be conflicting information about when that took place.

   This source says that General Logan resigned his seat in the spring of 1861. That would be before raising the 31st Illinois Volunteers ( The regiment was mustered into federal service on 18 September 1861) and being commissioned a colonel. (And before fighting at First Manassas as a civilian volunteer two months earlier).

General John A. Logan   If this source is correct, then General Logan was not a Congressman and an Army officer at the same time.

   But then when you read his Congressional biography, it says that he resigned his seat in Congress in April of 1862. If that is true, then he was still a Congressman after organizing the 31st Illinois Volunteers and serving as its colonel. It would mean that he was still a member of Congress when he fought at Belmont and Ft. Donelson, and that he only resigned from Congress after being made a BG, USV in March of 1862.

LOGAN, John Alexander - Biographical Information

   To confuse the matter further, this source says that General Logan fought at First Manassas as a civilian in July of 1861, then resigned from the Congress before raising the 31st Illinois two months later. If this is true, then he was not a Congressman and an Army officer at the same time.

John A. Logan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

   So, different sources give at least three different dates for the resignation of General Logan's Congressional seat. The answer to the question depends on what the actual date of resignation was. Obviously, at least two of the ones given here are wrong.

 


Last edited on Tue Aug 20th, 2013 03:12 am by Texas Defender



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