Civil War Interactive Discussion Board Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


A Great American Soldier. - Thomas Stonewall Jackson - The Participants of the War - Mikitary & Civilian - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
 Moderated by: javal1
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu Oct 6th, 2011 04:41 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
Old Blu
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 16th, 2008
Location: Waynesboro., Virginia USA
Posts: 327
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.

Cannon in the background are Confederate.  Union are behind me.  IT was a 300 yard cannon battle on Henry Hill 1st Manassas.


Last edited on Thu Oct 6th, 2011 04:44 pm by Old Blu



 Posted: Thu Oct 6th, 2011 06:11 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
Mark
Member
 

Joined: Mon Mar 30th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 434
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Nice picture. I always thought that this ought to be called Thomas Jackson's Steroid memorial! It's a great example of how historical memory overwhelms reality.

Mark



 Posted: Thu Oct 6th, 2011 11:32 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
Old Blu
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 16th, 2008
Location: Waynesboro., Virginia USA
Posts: 327
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Mark wrote: Nice picture. I always thought that this ought to be called Thomas Jackson's Steroid memorial! It's a great example of how historical memory overwhelms reality.

Mark


heh heh.  Don't take it so hard, Mark.  It is just a statue!



 Posted: Fri Oct 7th, 2011 01:49 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
Hellcat
Root Beer Lover


Joined: Tue Nov 15th, 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 867
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Why does that sound like a pun to me?

To be honest, Old, I can't really make out any cannons. I do believe you that their there, though. There are objects back along the tree line that are probably the cannons but I can't tell what they are exactly. Nice shot of the statue, and as it's the focus of the picture it should certainly be what draws the eye. But I kinda wonder what was going on with that pedestal. Reminds me of a tomb. Not the coloring, the design. I swear I've seen some tombs designed like that. Kinda makes it weird to look at the statue with that running through my head.



 Posted: Fri Oct 7th, 2011 01:58 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
Old Blu
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 16th, 2008
Location: Waynesboro., Virginia USA
Posts: 327
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Hellcat wrote: Why does that sound like a pun to me?

To be honest, Old, I can't really make out any cannons. I do believe you that their there, though. There are objects back along the tree line that are probably the cannons but I can't tell what they are exactly. Nice shot of the statue, and as it's the focus of the picture it should certainly be what draws the eye. But I kinda wonder what was going on with that pedestal. Reminds me of a tomb. Not the coloring, the design. I swear I've seen some tombs designed like that. Kinda makes it weird to look at the statue with that running through my head.

Yep. those unplain items are the cannons of the Confederate army from 1st. Manassas.
Union cannon are behind me.



 Posted: Sat Oct 8th, 2011 02:23 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
6th Post
pender
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 8th, 2011
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 148
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Mark wrote: Nice picture. I always thought that this ought to be called Thomas Jackson's Steroid memorial! It's a great example of how historical memory overwhelms reality.

Mark


Mark, I disagree with your assessment. " It's a great example of how historical memory overwhelms reality." In Michael Kammen's book" Mystic chords of memory" The transformation of tradition in american culture. On page 491 he writes " Most southerners remained sufficiently custom bound that public sculpture and other sorts of historic memorials had to be fairly conventional in order to win favor. In 1939, for example, when the Virginia state art commission selected a modernistic and impressionistic model for an equestrian statue of Stonewall Jackson to be erected on the battle field at Manassas, it aroused a furor. Members of the UDC and the Sons of Confederate veterans complained that the horse was too stocky and the rider looked more like U.S. Grant than Jackson. Similar episodes occured at regular intervals."

That is why, I would have to disagree with you on that one Mark. Unless you are refering to yankee memory. This would help explain why they could not stop Old Jack.

Pender

 



 Posted: Sat Oct 8th, 2011 03:09 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
7th Post
Mark
Member
 

Joined: Mon Mar 30th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 434
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Perhaps I should clarify... Stonewall Jackson was unquestionably a superb Confederate general. However, according to the historical record he was also man with a slight build and a hypochondriac who preferred to wear an old ill-fitting old uniform and rode a poor excuse for a horse that was the butt of many army jokes. In this memorial, we see a larger than life figure that could bench-press 300lbs in a close fitting confederate uniform, on a horse that could win the win the triple crown. I'm just saying that when this memorial was sculpted the artist portrayed what he wanted the audience to remember about Jackson instead of reality. All memorials do this to some extent of course, but this one is the most blatant example of it that I can think of. Hope that clarifies things.

Mark



 Posted: Mon Oct 29th, 2012 07:19 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
8th Post
Darryl
Member
 

Joined: Mon Oct 22nd, 2012
Location:  
Posts: 43
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Mark you need to remember the fact that JEB Stuart bought him a complete new uniform which he did wear. Including a new forage cap. His horse was not that sorry looking, Although compared to the blooded mounts of the other officers he did leave much to be desired.



 Posted: Mon Oct 29th, 2012 07:24 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
9th Post
Darryl
Member
 

Joined: Mon Oct 22nd, 2012
Location:  
Posts: 43
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Mark, I learned something very important when I portrayed JEB Stuart. You have to include some of the legend in your portrayal. Doesn't mean you are demaning or lying, it just means most people have a set image in their mind and if you deviate from it too much you destroy the whole effect. If you wear something not quite right or something they have never seen him in you better be able to explain in a credibile manner why you're wearing it. Its not easy doing a major historical figure but if you really go into the person's mind with an open outlook and not be pompous you will do a better job.



 Current time is 01:13 pm
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.3655 seconds (9% database + 91% PHP). 28 queries executed.