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 Posted: Mon Aug 5th, 2013 03:58 pm
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Texas Defender
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  On this, the 149th anniversary of the Battle of Mobile Bay, it is fitting to remember the defining moment in the long career of the: "First admiral," David Glasgow Farragut.

Damn the Torpedoes!

  This article explains the battle in detail, as well as recounting how then James Glasgow Farragut became connected to the Porter family and the U.S. Navy.

  I must take issue with some of the details written by the distinguished author, however. When James Glasgow Farragut became a midshipman in December of 1810, he was nine years old, not eight. At that time, David Porter was a commander in the Navy. He was promoted to captain in July of 1812, while he and his adopted son were on their epic journey in the frigate ESSEX. In addition, while Admiral Farragut and Admiral Franklin Buchanan had spent over 100 years combined as sailors, it was not all spent at sea. Their service was divided about equally on land and at sea.

  In 1814, the journey of Captain Porter and Midshipman Farragut ended when the ESSEX engaged in a losing battle with two British warships, and was captured. Young Farragut experienced the horrors of combat at a very early age, and it filled him with a lifelong desire to get even with the British, which he was never in a position to do. Once during the Civil War he said that he would have much preferred to lay his ship next to a British man of war than to fight his own people.

  To me, Admiral Farragut is one of the most interesting figures in the Civil War. Those who would like to learn a great deal about him would do well to study this biography of him written by the famous author of naval doctrine, Alfred Thayer Mahan. It can be read in its entirely online.

A.T. Mahan's Admiral Farragut 1 / Sun Tzu The Art of War and Strategy Site by

Last edited on Mon Aug 5th, 2013 08:49 pm by Texas Defender



 Posted: Wed Aug 7th, 2013 12:01 am
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Hellcat
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TD, when did he change his first name to David? Twice you say James Glasgow Farragut an I wasn't aware he changed his name. But then it's not unheard of, Hiram Ulysses Grant would know that.



 Posted: Wed Aug 7th, 2013 12:46 am
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Texas Defender
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Hellcat-

  Most sources that I have seen say that Midshipman Farragut changed his name in 1812, while on the ESSEX.

  After the ESSEX was captured, young Farragut returned to the northeast as a paroled prisoner of war. He was exchanged in November of 1814, and assigned to another ship, but the war ended before the ship sailed. By then, he was definately known as: "David."

Farragut, Admiral David Glasglow, Gravesite---American Latino Heritage: A Disc

   The source above is well done, but the statement that Admiral Farragut was the only officer to receive the Thanks of Congress twice is incorrect. Actually, General Sherman was the only officer to receive the Thanks of Congress twice during the war.

  Admiral Farragut received the Thanks of Congress for the Battle of New Orleans in 1862 and the Battle of Mobile Bay in 1864, but the second award was not approved until 1866.

Thanks of Congress - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


 

Last edited on Wed Aug 7th, 2013 02:08 am by Texas Defender



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